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Scottish Farmed Salmon Fillets

Why Scottish Farmed Salmon is the Best in the World

The world’s hunger for Scottish farmed salmon has become increasingly hard to satisfy in recent years.  Independent surveys show that the demand for salmon farmed in Scotland is now higher than it has ever been with at least 65 different countries importing the fish. In fact, the surveys also show that exports of Scottish farmed salmon are now up to £65 million around the globe.

Scotland’s favorite fish is being used in more and more recipes all over the world as people find new ways to enjoy it. Salmon has been farmed in Scotland for a very long time and with over 26,000 tonnes of the fish being shipped over the Atlantic Ocean to be consumed in the United States alone, not to mention the 35,000 tonnes sent to Europe with a further 11,000 tonnes shipped to the Far East. It’s fair to say that Scottish salmon farmers have perfected their craft.

The salmon is not only in demand overseas but here in the UK Scottish farmed salmons popularity has continued to soar. It is also in menus of incredibly high profile events in recent years such as at Buckingham Palace for the Royal Wedding, where it was served to 350 guests during the wedding breakfast. Farmed Scottish salmon is also giving the traditional full English breakfast a run for its money by being a key ingredient in Eggs Royale, a popular breakfast that is appearing on more and more menus around the world. It recently was added to the breakfast menu of the JD Weatherspoon Company and will be served before 11 am in every JD Weatherspoon pub in the UK. Without the Scottish salmon as the special ingredient, this dish is just egged on a muffin.

Where the demand for Scottish salmon continues to grow Scottish salmon farmers are frequently under fire from environmental campaigners who believe the intense farming could be damaging to ecosystems and wild stock. One of the directors of the salmon farming organisation Loch Duart has made it clear that their organisation is working hard to make sure they respect the environment. Plus, in not allowing the increasing demand for more fish to become something that overshadows these environmental concerns they are quoted as saying, “We’ve got to have an authentic message, a clear set of farming principles that the customer can buy into, that can be verified. We were the first to have RSPCA welfare standards.”

This press, however, hasn’t been enough for the demand for Scottish farmed salmon to slow down. The salmon itself is a healthy eating option known to some as a ‘superfood.’ Not only that, for many body image-conscious consumers, it is seen as an affordable and delicious source of protein that suits their lifestyle & goes with many recipes.

Seafood International a publication that compares and rates different forms of seafood and assesses their quality. As well as the ethical nature of how it’s produced, it has named Scottish, farmed salmon the ‘best in the world’ back in 201. After a survey, it conducted by pitting Scottish salmon farmers against rival salmon farmers from around the world. It was compared to salmon farmed both in Canada and Norway however; it won by a wide margin. The result of the survey was announced at the world’s largest seafood show, European Seafood Exposition. So far Scottish farmed salmon still holds this title and shows no sign to losing it to any other country anytime soon.

John Fiorillo, Editor of Seafood International, said following this, “The survey results are significant because these are some of the biggest and most influential seafood buyers in the world. To choose Scottish salmon is high praise because what these customers purchase ultimately ends up on restaurant menus and dinner plates at home – the buyers are the gatekeepers to the consumer.”

Though an endorsement from Seafood International may have made it official, Scottish farmed salmon is the best in the world. It has never been a secret by those in the fishing, farming and culinary worlds. Scottish farmed salmon is the first fish to win the ‘Label Rouge’ from the French culinary arts authorities. In fact not only was Scottish farmed salmon the first fish to win this prestigious honour but it was the first non-French food to win! This particular award, coming from such qualified and peerless judges is just as important as any survey and is something only Scottish farmed salmon can boast.

Any food sold throughout the world that carries the ‘Label Rouge’ or red label is considered to be of superior quality when compared to its competitors. It is also a testament to the fact that the food is sourced ethically and has met certain criteria and standards that set it apart from anything else. Essentially, Scottish farmed salmon is in a class of its own when compared to the rest of the world. Even Scotland’s proudest and biggest export, its whiskey, cannot match this accolade.

Speaking on their website about the success of Scottish farmed salmon, Scott Landsburgh, chief executive of the Scottish Salmon Producers’ Organisation said, “Scottish salmon is renowned for high quality, firm texture and distinct flavours. These characteristics, coupled with many health benefits and full traceability, are important attributes for a growing number of consumers. Our industry is committed to raising the profile of Scottish salmon in new and emerging markets, and I think these results are proof that we are beginning to reap the rewards.”

He went on to conclude, “The success of Scottish salmon is a testament to the dedication of our farmers who farm with care, passion, and pride. Producers are committed to raising salmon of the highest quality and employ the latest innovations and technologies to refine their production methods. These results are good news for the local communities in which our salmon grow and a boost to the wider economy of Scotland.”

https://www.aoseafood.co.uk/buy/salmon-fillets/salmon-and-what-it-has-to-do-with-the-price-of-fish/

the price of salmon

Float Like A Butterfly, Sting Like…The Price of Salmon?

So said the late, great famous boxer Muhammad Ali.

Ok…maybe I’ve altered it slightly to fit my theme. I’m sure you get the point.

But to eatery owners and kitchen chefs across the country, these words are ringing as true as George Foreman’s ears in the 8th round of ‘The Rumble in the Jungle’ (YouTube it), stung by the steep increase in the price of salmon, the same way Foreman was by Ali’s quick one-two in ’74 (like a bee, as the true saying goes).

So, Why the increase in the price of Salmon?

Chile, the second largest exporter of salmon in the world behind Norway, has suffered from an algal bloom, killing off around 20% of production levels. The bloom, caused by unusually high water temperatures fuelled by El Nino, starved the salmon of oxygen, and lead to the loss of 123,500 tonnes of the restaurant menu staple to date*.

In addition, extreme weather has affected Norwegian production, as well as an outbreak of sea lice in other areas.

As a result, the law of supply and demand has taken hold, driving salmon prices to unprecedented levels not seen before – estimates of the increase vary between 50-60% in the first half of 2016.

Some kitchens have taken the step of replacing the salmon with something else on their menu; others have persevered, waiting for the price to drop. Whatever you decide to do, whether you’re an existing customer or looking to change supplier, you can rely on AO Seafood to help. We use best Scottish, the ‘Ali’ of salmon, and our prices remain competitive. So if you’re “on the ropes” with your salmon why not give us a call on 01282 429000 or fill out the below form to discuss your options.

As the great man once said, “it is not the mountains ahead that tire you out, it’s the pebble in your shoe.”

Hang tough; it’ll soon be over.

*Correct as of May 2016

https://www.aoseafood.co.uk/buy/salmon-fillets/why-scottish-farmed-salmon-is-the-best-in-the-world/

Salmon, and what it has to do with the price of fish.

Salmon: “Whats that got to do with the price of fish?”

 

Salmon Fillets
One of our prep lads Danny with one of fresh Scottish Salmon, ready to be prepared.

The price of salmon has been changing for years but only recently has it become an issue with prices being higher than ever before. Today I will take a look at the cost of salmon and what makes it so vulnerable to price fluctuations, so that our customers stay as well informed as possible.

As you can imagine, the huge majority of the EU gets its salmon from the North Sea(Norway is the worlds leading supplier) so in theory we should always have plentiful salmon stocks. However at the end of last year, Norway had an issue with disease which lead to a reduction in breeding, which the market could have ultimately recovered from. However, Chile(the worlds second largest supplier) was hit by toxic sea algae bloom in recently months, which in effect suffocates salmon, killing them off.

“But that’s fine!” I hear you shout, ” the EU buys its own salmon supplied from the North Sea!” Unfortunately, life just isn’t that simple. The world operates in a free market, which means that wherever demand is highest, the price will be highest and whilst there is demand, the price will stay high. Now, naturally the US bought most of its salmon through Chile and other South American countries however this algae bloom has wiped out over a third of the Chilean salmon meaning the US must go elsewhere for it. The second closest market to the Americas is the Norwegian market, where supply has already been reduced slightly. Thus, the US has slowly been buying more salmon from Norway, pushing the price up slightly, which, in turn will drive the price up exponentially until it becomes no longer economically viable.

Unfortunately this is the way of the world so if we can give you any advice it should be to stock up on salmon fillets and freeze some before the summer hits in full force and fresh salmon becomes too expensive for the general public…. Again…

Keep checking our blogs for other articles relating to sustainability and the changes in the world fish market.

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